Stone sculptures by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi

Stone sculptures by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi

Stone sculptures by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi

Stone sculpture by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi

Stone sculpture by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi

Two Taranaki andesite stone sculptures by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi were shown in the grounds.

Born and raised in Tonga, Filipe immigrated to New Zealand in 1978 and has been a full-time artist since 1992.

He lived in New Plymouth for over two decades and was one of the initiators of the biennial Taranaki Stone symposium, Te Kupenga.

Stone sculpture by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi

Stone sculpture by Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi

His sculptures are in many collections, such as Te Papa or the Auckland city art gallery, throughout Aotearoa | New Zealand and beyond.

A major aspect of his art practice is the Pacific art form of lalava (lashing), used as a means for joining and connecting materials since ancient times in the pacific region. Lalava is not only used traditionally for its functional use in building customary houses, sea-faring vessels and tools but it also incorporates a history of diverse patternings. These complex symmetrical lashings are also used to convey rich layerings of cultural information.

Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi translates, transposes and transmutes lalava forms and patterns, producing a variety of contemporary expressions varying from large public sculptures in stone and metal to precisely cut wooden sculptures, intricately lashed poles, or illusionistic drawings and paintings. In experimenting with scale and materials, he uses the lalava patterns as a mnemonic device. His title, Sopolemalama, was bestowed upon completion of the Fale Maota in Samoa during which he trained two Matais to help complete the fale.

Sopolemalama Filipe Tohi’s website Lalava.net

Back view of a sculpture by Filipe Tohi + Network by Michelle Backhouse

Rear view of a sculpture by Filipe Tohi with a view of “Network” by Michelle Backhouse


Stone sculpture by Filipe Tohi

Front view of the same sculpture by Filipe Tohi

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Fern cloaks by Adrienne Spratt, Brenda Tuuta + Jenny of Wananga O Aotearoa, Palmerston North

Installation by Adrienne Spratt, Brenda Tuuta + Jenny“Te Kahu o patupaiarehe I tenei māra,” installation utilizing plants from the Otaki Forks Artspace property (harakeke, mamaku, ponga + other ferns) by Adrienne Spratt, Brenda Tuuta + Jenny from the Wānanga O Aotearoa in Palmerston North.

They made two site specific installations weaving ferns, ponga and harakeke. The title refers to these cloaks as being from the fairy folk in this garden.
 
 



 
 
Adrienne, Jenny + Brenda
 
Woven fern cloak by Adrienne, Brenda + Jenny

Woven fern cloak by Adrienne, Brenda + Jenny

 

 

 
See Adrienne’s bio page on this website.

See Brenda’s bio page on this website.